WPP is NRA lobbyist and creates gun control ads

An agency owned by WPP produced this ad for the organization States United to Prevent Gun Violence in 2013

The word’s largest advertising holding WPP, collected $1.46m in lobbying fees from the National Rifle Association while at the same time produced compelling and widely circulated gun control public service announcements.

It seems to me that once we ignore contradictions of dumb money and spiritual conduct, our superficial mindset takes over and common sense is thrown out the window. I think we should focus our human life on being a flow moment explorer, where we help ourselves and others understand and ignore evil in spiritual, verbal and physical action. We might as well start with WPP and LaPierre:

The NRA’s chief executive argued this past Sunday that Americans would be safer if their access to guns was expanded and if federal laws that restrict gun rights locally were overturned.

“There are monsters like this monster out there every day,” he said. “Nobody should be forced to face evil with empty hands.”

via The Guardian

Flip-flopping Facebook Pitches

The point is, if there’s anyone who knows how to blind the marketing industry with horseshit, it’s Facebook. But now, they may actually be in a position to do the marketing world some good despite the industry’s unwillingness to help itself.

As always, Bob Hoffmann knows how to break it down, this time how Facebook has flipflopped their sales pitches to gullible marketeers. Zuckerberg once proclaimed that brands are now part of the conversation, yet they never paid to be part of it, all they got was super cheap ads disguised as text boxes. Oh wait, brands also pay for personal data that users willingly give away for free.

More importantly, the mostly blue and white site is loosing teens since their parents are on Facebook too. Bob argues this might be a good chance for them to target users over 50, good luck.

via The Ad Contrarian

Hack yourself before your wreck yourself

One of the Facebook’s and Google’s early investors, Roger McNamee, regrets that he helped create monsters who want to sell you ever more ads by creating addictive behavior with a substance they harvested from hacking your brain.

Borrowing techniques from the gambling industry, Facebook, Google and others exploit human nature, creating addictive behaviors that compel consumers to check for new messages, respond to notifications, and seek validation from technologies whose only goal is to generate profits for their owners.

I’m always amazed that consumers forget how powerful they are, here’s a simple counter hack: don’t give them your personal information, clicks or likes and don’t buy into addictive illusions.

via USA Today