Reputation Content

The standard internet model of putting ads next to everything is under pressure, as advertisers are realizing that „everything,“ on the internet, means mostly racist videos….if there’s a backlash against the just-put-it-anywhere ethos of advertising on the internet, that will benefit traditional arbiters of truth and newsworthiness. It’s a nice revenge of traditional journalism against Google.

It’s reassurung to see that advertisers are increasingly selective about where they place their ads – a wink towards programmatic over grazers. The same goes for content. I think we’ll see advertisers choose with sharper eyes who they want to cooperate with. Before that happens they’ll need to figure out who is harmful to their brand, fakes followers or abuses readers trust. A strong brand will eventually end up in the cheap seats if the content is more focused on pr noise than true voice.

via Bloomberg

Sure, throw away your ad money

„Ad fraud is estimated to be between 2% and 90%. In other words, no one has a fucking clue. Most knowledgeable people (including the WFA) believe it may easily be 30%. No matter what your „cyber-security team“ tells you, nobody knows how much fraud there is in online advertising. But everyone agrees it’s massive.“

I still don’t understand why clients spend their money with well known tricksters, who care more about cheap automation than human information, oh and kickbacks. Sure, there are efforts to get viewable impressions trackable and credible and Google’s AdSense still makes so much sense, jaa, but too many parts of the interwebs enjoy affinity to money that disappears into cybernirvana or pockets of hot air.

via The Ad Contrarian

 

Adblock arms race

„The fundamental problem with advertising as a business model though, is that customers don’t like it unless it is very unobtrusive, and the industry is largely incapable of self control in that respect (did you know that most people install ad blockers due to worry about use of their data to „personalise“ them). It is a „tragedy of the commons“ problem in that it is always to the advantage of the „ad-overgrazer“, so cheaters prosper – so it’s always just easier to assume the endgame, i.e. they are all acting in bad faith – and block the lot.“

The world of pop-up ads is coming to an end, thanks to ad blocker tools, conscious customers and less intrusive ads. Albeit, subtle ads are not necessarily the more likeable way to communicate commercialism, especially when your friends promote products in their digital channels and you’re not quite sure if it’s an ad or not.

We could do with media education as a required course in schools these days, or we’ll see the beloved ad-overgrazers pop-up in the minds of our future generations without even noticing it.

via broadstuff